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Tag Archives | sake

Tender Microwaved Chicken Breast

Tender Microwaved Chicken Breast

Japanese home cooks often use microwave for food preparation. As Japanese food tend to use less oil, and try not to overcook in general, the use of microwave makes good sense. Microwaving food saves time, and actually preserves nutritional value of the food compare to using other cooking methods. You might not believe, but I […]

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Doburoku Trial

Doburoku Trial

It is illegal to make alcoholic beverages without a license, regardless whether it is for sale or for personal consumption in Japan. And the process of obtaining the license is so difficult and expensive, that it is only worth it for businesses. In this busy 21st Century, not so many people are interested in brewing […]

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Koji Making

Koji Making

I’ve made miso, sake (doburoku), amazake, or other fermented products using rice koji. But I’ve never made koji itself. Koji is cereal covered with cultured mold. Most common koji is rice koji, which can be bought at a Japanese grocery store or through several online shopping sites. There are other types of koji exist, such […]

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Doburoku

Doburoku

One of my Japanese friends who loves to make many wonderful things gave me a cup of handmade sake to try! Unlike store bought sake, it’s cloudy, but it’s definitely sake. This type of unrefined homemade sake is called doburoku, but both sake and doburoku can be drank or used in the same way. Many […]

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Koji

Koji

Koji is a culture which is made up of multiple complex organisms, including mold, bacteria among others. In humid Japan, koji occurs naturally. It generates an enzyme, which causes fermentation that brews the sake, soy sauce, shochu (Japanese distilled liquor), vinegar, and creates miso and pickles. In order to make koji, rice, barley, soy beans […]

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Sake for Japanese Cooking

Sake for Japanese Cooking

Japanese recipes often use sake for Japanese cooking, because it increases the flavor of food, removes the unpleasant smell of fish, and tenderizes meat. But unlike wine in French or Italian food, Japanese food doesn’t require expensive sake. Rather, Japanese chefs say that cheaper one is better for cooking. One of my neighborhood liquor store […]

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Mirin

Mirin

Mirin is one of the Japanese condiment resembling sake, but has a much higher sugar content. It can be made at home, by adding rice koji to sochu (unflavored distilled liquor, vodka can be used in the U.S.), and let it sit over 6 month. Over time the mixture will be highly alcoholic and sweet. […]

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